Safe Babywearing

Keep your baby close and keep your baby safe. When you’re wearing a sling or carrier, don’t forget the T.I.C.K.S. or ABC Checklist.

The T.I.C.K.S. Rule for Safe Babywearing.

Keep your baby close and keep your baby safe. When you’re wearing a sling or carrier, don’t forget the T.I.C.K.S.

Carrying Safety

Carrying is a great experience and bonding tool for all, but only when done in a safe and supportive way. So how do we keep our children safe while carrying?r

T.I.C.K.S is the universal acronym for rules to safe babywearing. These rules are most important with newborn babies as they have little to no muscle control, meaning they are most at risk. This isn’t to say the rules aren’t as important with older children, Or that this is just for slings. 
Car seats, baby bouncers & seats, but also in arms carrying can become dangerous if the child is incorrectly positioned.

Tight,
In view at all times,
Close enough to kiss,
Keep the chin off chest and
Supported back.

We would never advise the use of a cradle carry, bag slings, pouch slings or any badly ill-fitting sling, The main issue with these is the baby
could very easily slump down into an unsafe position, chin dropping to the child’s chest potentially blocking the airway.

Credit to The UK Sling Consortium, a group of sling manufacturers and retailers that came together after concerns were raised over the
safety of bag slings (not pouch or ring slings). Bag slings from 2 manufacturers have been recalled and discontinued.

R

TIGHT

R

IN VIEW AT ALL TIMES

R

CLOSE ENOUGH TO KISS

R

KEEP CHIN OFF THE CHEST

R

SUPPORTED BACK

TIGHT

Slings and carriers should be tight enough to hug your baby close to you as this will be most comfortable for you both. Any slack/loose fabric will allow your baby to slump down in the carrier which can hinder their breathing and pull on your back.

IN VIEW AT ALL TIMES

you should always be able to see your baby’s face by simply glancing down. The fabric of a sling or carrier should not close around them so you have to open it to check on them. In a cradle position
your baby should face upwards not be turned in towards your body.

CLOSE ENOUGH TO KISS

your baby’s head should be as close to your chin as is comfortable. By tipping your head forward you should be able to kiss your baby on the head or forehead.

KEEP CHIN OFF THE CHEST

A baby should never be curled so their chin is forced onto their chest as this can restrict their breathing. Ensure there is always a space of at least a finger width under your baby’s chin.

SUPPORTED BACK

In an upright carry a baby should be held comfortably close to the wearer so their back is supported in its natural position and their tummy and chest are against you. If a sling is too loose they can slump which can partially close their airway. (This can be tested by placing a hand on your baby’s back and pressing gently – they should not uncurl or move closer to you.) A baby in a cradle carry in a pouch or ring sling should be positioned carefully with their bottom in the deepest part so the sling does not fold them in half pressing their chin to their chest.

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